JA4.2. Attributes of moral field
#1
@ Dr. Ing. Jan Pająk

JA4.2. Attributes of moral field
 

Previous subsections explained illustratively, what moral field is, how it runs, and how to practically determine in which direction it rises the most steeply. This subsection formally summarises the explanations provided before, providing a list of attributes of moral field, that were identified so far.
Each intelligent activity, including each thought, feeling, stand, or physical activity completed by an intelligent creature, always changes positions in the moral field for all these intellects in which this activity induces any kind of feelings. Therefore, every such an activity, due to changes of someone's position in the moral field, clearly belongs either to a totaliztic category "moral" or to a category "immoral". Basic attributes of the moral field allow us to determine, to which one of these two categories a given activity belongs. They also help us to transform "immoral" activities into "moral" ones which still allow us to accomplish the same original goal. For this reason, in spite that these attributes were already discussed, now they are combined into a structured list.
Attributes of the moral field can be subdivided into two groups: a) categorizing attributes and b) descriptive attributes. Categorising attributes are these ones, which help to distinguish easily between moral human activities, from immoral activities. Therefore, each attribute belonging to this group is clearly fulfilled by one category of human activities (e.g. by moral activities), but is not fulfilled by the opposite category of activities (e.g. by immoral activities). In turn descriptive attributes are these, which explain various regularities detectable in the way moral field is configured and works.
Listed below are the most important attributes of the moral field. Here they are:
A. Categorising attributes. (These allow for an easy categorising. Means they allow for an easy distinguishing between such human actions which are “moral” – and thus which obey attributes marked “yes” on the list below but disobey attributes marked “no”, and such human actions which are “immoral” – thus which disobey attributes marked “yes” but obey attributes marked “no.) Here they are:
1Yes. "Moral" are all these feelings-inducing activities, which either move uphill in the moral field all intellects that are affected by them, or which prevent the pushing these intellects downwards in the moral field. Completion of moral activities always brings immediate benefits of a moral nature. In turn an active prevention of moral activities immediately brings some kind of immoral consequences.
2Yes. All opposites or reversals of the activity, which represents a movement uphill in the moral field, and thus is "moral", are going to represent movement downhill in the moral field, and thus are going to be "immoral".
3Yes. The direction of the steepest slope of the moral field, and thus the direction of the most "moral" activities, is indicated by these feasible activities, which require putting into them the highest intellectual effort, or which are opposite to the line of the least intellectual resistance.
1No. "Immoral" are all these feelings-inducing activities, which either push downhill in the moral field all intellects that are affected by them, or which prevent the rising of these intellects upwards in the moral field. A completion of immoral activities always brings immediate consequences of an immoral nature. In turn an active prevention of immoral activities immediately brings some kind of moral benefits.
2No. All opposites or reversals of the activity, which represents a movement downhill in the moral field, and thus is "immoral", are going to represent movement uphill in the moral field, and thus are going to be "moral".
3No. The direction of the steepest downhill slope of the moral field, and thus the direction of the most "immoral" activities, is indicated by these feasible activities, which do not require putting into them any intellectual effort, or which are aligned with the line of the least intellectual resistance.
B. Descriptive attributes (these describe various regularities detected so-far in the way moral field is configured and works):
B1. In the real-life situation, everything is either "moral" or is "immoral". Therefore, this something either is "moral", and thus it fulfils all the attributes (1Yes), (2Yes), and (3Yes) above, but simultaneously it does NOT fulfil all the attributes (1No), (2No) and (3No) above. Or this something is "immoral", and thus it fulfils all the attributes (1No), (2No), and (3No), but simultaneously it does NOT fulfil attributes (1Yes), (2Yes), and (3Yes). For this reason, when we discover that a given our activity/intension fulfils, or not fulfils, even a single one out of all the above attributes (1Yes), (2Yes), (3Yes), and (1No), (2No), (3No), this practically means that after a careful consideration we are going to discover that particular activity/intension is accordingly also fulfilling, or not fulfilling, all the remaining attributes marked with the same symbol “Yes” or “No”. For this reason, in order to effectively categorize our actions with the use of the moral field, it is enough to find a single attribute which sticks out in a given situation amongst the whole list (1Yes), (2Yes), (3Yes), and (1No), (2No), (3No), and then clearly establish whether it is fulfilled, or not fulfilled. (An example of categorising with the use of attributes of moral field, is provided in subsection JA4.3.)
B2. Every real-life situation in which anyone can find him/herself, always provides the people who take part in it, with at least the choice of two solutions morally opposite to each other, out of which one always represents the motion uphill in the moral field (means is moral), while the other always represents the motion downhill in the moral field (means is immoral). If in a given situation more than two solutions do exist, then they always can be arranged into opposite pairs, so that for each pair one solution is moral, while the other one is immoral. For example, consider a situation described in subsections JC11.1 /?/ and JC8 /?/, when there is a self- defence categorised as "your life or mine". In this situation always at least two solutions exist, namely one going uphill in the moral field - when the attacked kills the attacker, and other one going downhill - when the attacker kills the attacked. Trough the mutual comparison with each other both the opposite solutions from a given situation, every person has a possibility of easier distinguishing the course of action which is moral, from a course of action which is immoral.
B3. Actions, which are perfectly moral, means which climb precisely upwards in the moral field - while their vector forms the angle of 0 degrees with this moral field, do NOT have the so-called "side effects". (The topic of "side effects" is addressed in subsection JC11.8. /?/) Furthermore actions, which are fully immoral, means which run precisely downwards in the moral field, while their vectors form the angle of 180 degrees with the moral field, also do not create "side effects", although they duplicate later their immoral consequences in the form of unpleasant karmatic return. Thus, only the actions, the vectors of which are slanted towards the moral field under angles between 0 and 180 degrees, form side effects. The most powerful side effects have these actions, which are positioned under the angle of 90 degrees in relation to the moral field, i.e. which are difficult to qualify whether they belong to category "moral" or to category "immoral". This means that the appearance and the extend of side effects that result from a given action, can be used as one of indicators, how moral, or how immoral given actions are (e.g. how moral or immoral are given methods of healing).

=> JA4.3.
Antworten to top



Gehe zu:


Benutzer, die gerade dieses Thema anschauen: 1 Gast/Gäste