G14.2. Use of the Magnocraft as a selectively acting weapon
#1
© Dr. Eng. Jan Pająk

G14.2. Use of the Magnocraft as a selectively acting weapon

In order to use the Magnocraft as a selectively acting weapon for controlled destruction concentrating its impact exclusively on the metallic (conductive) objects of the other side, the destructive properties of its "inductive shield" are utilized. Simultaneously the "plasma whirl", always appearing together with the inductive shield, is prevented from acting on people and on organic substances so that they stay uninjured. The method by which the Magnocraft can be used for military operations, aimed at the destruction of the enemy's equipment only, is as follows:
Step 1. Switching to maximum power the spinning magnetic field that forms the magnetic whirl circulating around the vehicle. The force lines of that field passing through nearby conductive objects induce in them powerful electric currents that explosively evaporate their material.
Step 2. Forming from this spinning field a broad inductive shield with a range of evaporation to about 100 metres from the vehicle's surface (when the destructive plasma whirl has a range of only about 5 metres).
Step 3. Flying at an altitude of around 10 to 30 metres above an enemy's territory. As a result of such a flight, every object which is constructed from electrically conducting material will explode. This effect has a radius of about 100 metres from the craft. The disintegration of these materials will cause in turn:
a) Complete destruction of every object made of metal, such as: weapons, machinery, factories and their equipment, iron bridges, electric-power connections, underground installations made of metal, storage facilities, etc.
b) Destruction or damage of objects containing some parts made of metal, such as: buildings, concrete bridges, bunkers, roads, airfields, ports, etc.
Step 4. Undertaking a systematic flight covering every part of the target area, similar to the way a farmer ploughs a field.
It should be noted that the very high speed and manoeuvrability of the Magnocraft would allow operation in such a manner as to render ("plough") totally powerless a middle-sized European country, size of England, France, or Germany, with only one Magnocraft, in about 12 hours. After the vehicle completes its operation, inside of so neutralised country even a single object made of metal would be left intact, including into this not only all weapon systems, but also spoons, metal buttons, buckles in trousers and bra, and even metal teeth of all citizens of that country. So the destruction of a given country would be complete.
The military properties of the Magnocraft used as a weapon have no equivalent in any other fighting facility made by man to date. There are neither weapons nor defence methods that can oppose this vehicle. However, there is a major difference between the action of the Magnocraft and the effects of other weapon of mass destruction developed so-far by people. The Magnocraft – if it is used properly, acts selectively against the weapons, equipment, and technology of the other side, but not against people. Excluding victims of accidents, it mainly disarms the military forces, technology, industry, and economy of the opposite side, but leaves the enemy population alive. So even when the owners of the Magnocraft are forced to use it as weapon of necessary self-defence, it can still promote peace and serve humanity.

Table G1

Table G2

Table G2.
The determination of the "K" factor from the correlation between the value of this "K" factor and the "D/H" ratio for a single Magnocraft and for three homogenic configurations of the coupled Magnocraft ( namely for the spherical complex, for a stacked cigar, and for a double-ended cigar). In turn the knowledge of "K" allows us to determine precisely the type of individual vehicles arranged into a given configuration. After we find out this type it is possible to read all technical data for a given vehicle from Table G1.


Notice that equations for both cigars provided in this table are valid only if during the measurements the central axis of these cigars remains perpendicular to the line of our sight. In remaining cases a deviation angle "α" from the position that is perpendicular to the line of our sight must be determined, and then the value of "ΣH" should be corrected trigonometrically by the factor which depends on this deviation angle "α".

It should be noticed, that in order to determine the "K" factor for any of the configurations of Magnocraft presented in the above table, it is enough to determine the height "ΣH" and the outer diameter "D" of this configuration from a photograph, from a radar picture, or from a visual observation of this configuration. Then these two data need to be used in the equation provided for a given configuration in the last column of this table. In case of a stacked cigar, or a double-ended cigar, it is required to additionally determine the number "m" of vehicles that compose a given configuration, and conditionally also an angle of deviation "α" by which the central axis of this configuration slants from the position that is perpendicular to our line of sight. (This angle "α" allows us to correct trigonometrically the apparent - means the measured by us, value of the height "ΣH" to a value that is the real value of this height "ΣH".

For a practical verifying of equations from the table above, I would propose to determine the type of vehicles that create the stacked cigar shown in part d) of photograph from Figure P10.

Table G3

Table G3.
The colour changes in the lights of the SUB system of lamps (the location of these lamps on the Magnocraft's shell is presented in Figure G30). The SUB system indicates the Magnocraft's mode of operation. The sequence of colours emitted by each lamp of this system and shown by this table is characteristic for the magnetic whirl mode of the Magnocraft's operation (this particular table illustrates colour signals that would accompany the magnetic whirl from Figure G26). Symbols: t - time; T - period of the propulsor's output pulsation; n, o, s - output levels of amplitude in a particular propulsor (i.e. maximal, middle, minimal).

The rows in this table show the subsequent colours that each lamp (represented by the column labelled U, V, W, or X) emits at a given moment of time to describe the operation of propulsors which are labelled with a letter corresponding to that lamp (i.e. U, V, W, X). By observing only one lamp (e.g. that labelled V) it is evident that its colours change according to a sinusoidal curve that simulates the change of the magnetic field in a given (e.g. V) group of propulsors - e.g. compare the changes of curve V in Figure G26 with the changes of colours for V lamp in the above table. In this way the oscillation of colours simulate the pulsation of the magnetic field. But by observing only one colour (e.g. red) this table shows that with the elapse of time (i.e. after each quarter of the propulsors' period of pulsations) each colour moves to the next lamp. In this way the apparent motion of colours in the SUB system of lamps reflects the motion of the magnetic waves around the Magnocraft.
Note that for the throbbing mode of operation the colours of the lights would change in the same way in each lamp (i.e. all lamps would simultaneously change into the same colour), whereas in the magnetic lens mode all lamps would emit a yellow colour at all times.

Figure G1a    Figure G1b     Figure G1c

Fig. G1.
The side appearances of discoidal Magnocraft type K3. The smallest type of Magnocraft is illustrated, for which the K factor takes the value K = D/H = 3. This is why the type is called K3 type. This vehicle is shown in side views in three most frequently appearing situations, namely, a) as a single vehicle, b) as a spherical flying complex, and c) as a stacked flying cigar. Note that the outer diameter for the K=3 type of Magnocraft is equal to D = 0.5486*2K = 4.39 metres, while the total height is equal to H = D/K = 1.46 meters.


a) The side appearance of a single Magnocraft type K3, as it is defined by the theory from this monograph. The general shape and outlines of this vehicle are strictly defined by the set of mathematical equations derived from the design and operational conditions (these equations are listed in Figure G18). Its dimensions are also defined by these equations. The vehicle's shell is made of a mirror-like material whose degree of transparency and light reflectiveness can be strictly controlled. Thus, when the crew makes this shell transparent, elements of the internal structure (e.g. propulsors, compartments, separatory walls, etc.) can be seen by an outside observer. In the above illustration seven spherical propulsors (out of a total number of n=8) placed in the horizontal flange are visible. Each of these propulsors contains inside a twin-chamber capsule composed of two Oscillatory Chambers. The eight vertical partitions divide the vehicle's flange into eight separate chambers, each housing one side propulsor. The horizontal separatory ring placed at the top-half of the flange separates both magnetic poles (N and S) in each of these side propulsors, thus forcing the magnetic field which is produced to circulate through the environment. On the upper part of the flange three lamps of the SUB system (i.e. equivalent to the position lamps in aeroplanes) are indicated - see also Figure G30. In the centre of the vehicle the single main propulsor and its twin-chamber capsule are shown. Within the ring-shaped crew cabin a pilot's seat is visible. (Compare this illustration with Figure C1).

Notice that a photograph of just such K3 type vehicle taken in a side view, when it already flies, are shown in Figure P1 from volume 13 of this monograph. In different views, the same vehicle is shown over there also in Figures P15, P17a, P23, P24 (top), and P29.

b) An external (side) view of a spherical flying complex. An example illustrated here is obtained by coupling base-to-base two Magnocraft type K3. Notice that the coupling of larger vehicles (i.e. types K4 to K10) will produce a more flattened shape of such complexes.

c) A stacked cigar formed from 6 Magnocraft type K3. This cigar is shown in side view.

Figure G2

Fig. G2.
This diagram illustrates the principle of tilting a column of the magnetic field that is yielded from a magnetic propulsor containing cubical Oscillatory Chambers. In the propulsor illustrated, the magnetic axis "m" of a twin-chamber capsule which yields this field is controlled by two sets of mechanical rollers. The upper part "A-A" of the diagram presents this propulsor from two positions: as an overhead view (i.e. the right half of the diagram) and as the horizontal cross section along its top half (i.e. the left half of the diagram). The lower part "B-B" shows the same propulsor in vertical cross section (i.e. in the cross section passing through the magnetic axis "m" and the tilting plane "x"). Illustrated are: 1 - the spherical casing of the propulsor (the diameter “Ds” of this casing is equal to (G1): Ds = ao√3); 2 – one of four rollers operating in the vertical plane "x" (as well as these, the propulsor also contains another set of four similar rollers operating in the vertical plane "y"); 3 - the carrying structure, tilted by rollers, which holds the twin-chamber capsule; 4 - the inner cubical Oscillatory Chamber of the twin-chamber capsule, whose side edge is marked as "ai"; 5 - the outer cubical Oscillatory Chamber of the twin-chamber capsule whose side dimension “ao” is equal to ao=ai√3; m – magnetic axis of the propulsor (this axis represents the direction in which the propulsor's output is pointed); x, y - the two vertical tilting planes, perpendicular to each other.

Figure G3

Fig. G3.
The magnetic propulsion unit of the Magnocraft. It is illustrated as hovering above the northern (N) magnetic pole of Earth. Shown are: “M” - the single main propulsor involved in a repulsive force interaction “R” with the Earth's magnetic field (marked “M” from the word “main” propulsor); “R” – force of magnetic repulsion (marked “R” from the word “repulsive” interaction); “U, V, W, X” - eight side propulsors oriented so as to attract “A” the environmental magnetic field (marked “U, V, W, X” for emphasizing their mutual phase shifts by 90 degrees); “A” – forces of magnetic attraction. Note that in subsequent types of Magnocraft the number “n” of side propulsors is described by equations (G6) and (G2): n = 4(K-1). Thus the number n = 8 side propulsors has only the Magnocraft type K3. Each of these propulsors consists of a twin-chamber capsule (formed from one inner and one outer Oscillatory Chamber – as illustrated in Figure F5) assembled inside a spherical casing. Through an appropriate synchronization of the field pulsations in the side propulsors, a whirling magnetic field can be produced by this unit. Symbols: N - north magnetic pole (i.e. the “inlet” pole “I” as explained in subsection G5.2), S - south magnetic pole(i.e. the “outlet” pole “O” as explained in subsection G5.2), 1 - frame which joins the propulsors together; d - the maximal distance between the centres of any two side propulsors located diagonally opposite from each other in the unit (this vital distance "d" represents also the "nominal diameter" of rings burned by side propulsors during landings of the Magnocraft; it can be measured on landing sites of these vehicles – for details see Figure G33); h - the height of the centre of the main propulsor above the bases of the side propulsors; R - the force of magnetic repulsion; A - the force of magnetic attraction.

Figure G4

Fig. G4.
Two alternative positions of the Magnocraft during flight. These are called a) the "upright position", and b) the "inverted position". To illustrate the polarization of propulsors and the type of force interactions they create, both Magnocraft type K3 are shown in vertical cross-sections while hovering above the north (N) magnetic pole of Earth. Hatched (crossed) lines mark the location of their crew cabins. Note that independent of which one of these two flight positions is taken, the orientation of the magnetic poles of the propulsors in relation to the Magnocraft's shell remains unchanged. Therefore, when two vehicles so positioned (i.e. one in the upright position and the other in the inverted position) fly directly above/beneath each other, each one faces the other with like magnetic poles. Thus only repulsive forces can be created between two such Magnocraft (see also Figure G14). Symbols: R - a force of magnetic repulsion from the field of Earth; A - a force of magnetic attraction towards the Earth’s magnetic field; G - gravity pull of Earth; N, S - North and South magnetic poles (means “inlet” and “outlet” poles - according to subsection G5.2).


a) The upright position. The lifting force ("R") is created by the main propulsor, whereas the side propulsors create stabilization forces (A). Vehicles most frequently take this position during daylight flights.

b) The inverted position. This reverses the functions of the vehicle's propulsors, i.e. the main propulsor acts as a single stabilizer (A), whereas the side propulsors produce the lifting forces ("R"). During horizontal flights close to Earth, the gravity pull (G) acts like an additional stabilizer, decreasing the power engaged in magnetic circuits for propelling and stabilisation of the vehicle. Magnocraft most frequently use this position during night flights close to the surface of Earth. This is because then their crew cabin is moving close to the surface of the ground, allowing for a better observation.

Figure G5

Fig. G5.
The internal design of the Magnocraft and names of the main features of its shell. It is illustrated using an example of the middle-sized vehicle type K6, which utilizes n = 20 side propulsors and whose outer dimensions are: D = 0.5486*26 = 35.11 meters, H = D/K = D/6 = 5.85 meters (where the symbol * indicates multiplication while the symbol / indicates division). The material impenetrable by a magnetic field (magnetoreflective) is indicated by a broken line. The diagram presents:


- Magnetic propulsors: main (M), and two examples of side propulsors (U), (W) out of the total number n = 20 of side propulsors.

- Magnetoreflective shells: ceiling (5), topside alignment cone (2), complementary flange (6), crew cabin edge (7), base (11), underside alignment cone (12), central cylinder (3) and (13), separatory ring (9).

- Magnetoconductive shells: topside dome (4) which represents the central part of the convex top, underside bowl (14) which represents the central part of the concave bottom. In Magnocraft types K3 to K6 out of the magnetoconductive shell are also made of: flange's aerodynamic cover (8), flange's base (10) which in Magnocraft type K7 to K10 is made of a magnetoreflective material, while their functions are performed by magnetoconductive outlets from side columns that carry inside vehicle’s side propulsors.

- Spaces: living space containing a crew cabin (CC), central propulsion space ("C") subdivided into north (CN) and south (Cs) sections, lateral propulsion space (L) with its north (LN) and south (Ls[ttief]) sections.

- Facilities from inside of the hulk of Magnocraft: periscopes (1), telescopic legs (15). The Magnocraft’s shell will also be equipped into (not shown on this Figure): movable balustrade running around the side flange, an entrance lift, ladders, lamps of the SUB system.

Figure G6#1    Figure G6#2     Figure G6#3  
 
Figure G6#4    Figure G6#5     Figure G6#6


Fig. G6.
Examples of six classes of arrangements of the Magnocraft. Notice that examples of real vehicles representing all these classes are captured and illustrated on photographs from volume 13 of this monograph. Each class is obtained through coupling in a different manner several discoidal vehicles (illustrated above are arrangements of mainly K3 type Magnocraft). Within each class a number of further specific arrangements (not shown in this illustration) can be distinguished. For example, flying complexes (class #1) can be subdivided into: a) spherical flying complexes (shown in Figure G1b), b) cigar-shaped complexes (shown above) and c) fir-tree complexes (Figure G8b). Also vehicles arranged in any of the above classes can further cluster or couple with other arrangements, forming in this way an almost unlimited variety of shapes. Illustrated are examples of:

#1. Physical flying complexes. These are obtained when coupled vehicles are fixed in a steady physical contact. Illustrated is a cigar-shaped stack consisting of six Magnocraft type K3. Apart from cigars, to the class of physical flying complexes belong also spherical complexes and fir-tree formations.
#2. Semi-attached configurations - in spite of labile (point) contact, vehicles are steadily bond together with magnetic circuits visible as black bars.
#3. Detached configurations - vehicles do not physically touch each other, but are bond with repulsive and attractive magnetic interactions in equilibrium. The black bars mark the columns of magnetic field that join the side propulsors oriented as to attract one another (the main propulsors of both vehicles repel each other).
#4. Carrier platforms - obtained when smaller Magnocraft are suspended under the side propulsors of a bigger mother-ship (shown is a K5 type mother-ship carrying four K3 type vehicles).
#5. Flying systems - formed when several flying cigars are physically coupled together by their side propulsors.
#6. Flying clusters. These are formed through the bonding (without physical contact) of any other arrangements listed before. A two-dimensional "flying cross" is illustrated here. Its magnetic circuits that separate subsequent vehicles are shown with broken lines (these are always accompanied by numerous holding circuits which, for the clarity of illustration, are omitted here but are discussed in subsection G3.1.6 and shown in Figure G13).

Figure G7a     Figure G7b

Fig. G7.
A stacked cigar-shaped flying complex which represents one of the most efficient configurations obtainable through the magnetic coupling of a number of Magnocraft. This configuration is formed by stacking a number of subsequent Magnocraft of the same type (illustrated is a stack consisting of seven vehicles type K6) one on top of the other, like a pile of saucers stored in a kitchen cupboard. Because in subsection P2 of this monograph is formally proven that “UFOs are already operational Magnocraft”, probably a similar cigars of UFOs exploded near Tapanui in New Zealand in 1178 AD, and also in Tunguska, Central Siberia, in 1908. The outer dimensions of the Magnocraft type K6 are: D=35.11 meters, H=5.85 meters - see equations G13 and G7. After landing, n = 20 side propulsors present in this type of vehicle scorches a ring on the ground having the nominal diameter d = D/√2 = 24.82 meters – see equation G9.


a) External (side) view of the whole cigar-shaped complex. Please notice that examples of just such cigar-shaped flying complexes, only that flying in the magnetic whirl mode of operation (in which the surface of vehicles is covered with a spinning cloud of ionised air), were captured and shown on photographs from Figure P10 in monograph 13 of this series.

b) Vertical cross section of the complex showing the interaction of propulsors and the relative positioning of the compartments in the coupled vehicles. Symbols: G[ttief]S - the thickness of the complementary flange which is equal to the gap between the flanges of two subsequent vehicles (because this is equal, a number of such cigar-shaped flying complexes can be further coupled rim-to-rim into flying systems - see Figure G17); N, S - polarity of the subsequent magnetic propulsors.

Figure G8-1     Figure G8-2a     Figure G8-2b

Fig. G8.
Examples of physical flying complexes.
(1) Cut-away view of a double-ended cigar-shaped flying complex made by
coupling further units to both ends of a spherical complex. The hydraulic substance "angle's hair" is shown between the two central Magnocraft joined at their bases.
(2) An example of a "fir-tree" shaped flying complex formed by the stacking of smaller types of Magnocraft upon larger types. Shown are vertical cross-section a) and side view b) of this complex. Because of the binary growth of diameters of subsequent types of these vehicles, subsequent components of this complex cannot be shown in the same scale. (If they are shown to the same scale, then for the fir-tree illustrated here and composed of m = 4 Magnocraft, the external diameter “Dm” of the largest, bottom vehicle would be Dm/D = 2(m-1) = 23 = 8 times larger from the external diameter “D” of the smallest vehicle located on the top of this complex.)

(2a) Sectional view of the complex, showing the cooperation of propulsors and the relative positioning of compartments in the coupled vehicles.

(2b) External appearance of the whole complex. Notice that it is slightly deformed because of the lack of the same scale in drawings of all vehicles. In reality the configuration shown here would be much more “flat”. Also notice that examples of just such fir-tree flying complexes, only that flying in the magnetic whirl mode of operation (in which the surface of vehicles is covered with a spinning cloud of ionised air), were sighted by eye witnesses whose drawings are shown in Figure P11 from monograph 13 of this series.

Figure G9a     Figure G9b

Fig. G9.
Examples of semi-attached configurations: a) spool-shaped, b) "flying necklace".
a) An example of the simplest “spool-shaped”, semi-attached configuration. The spool-shaped arrangement illustrated here is formed by coupling together two Magnocraft type K3 whose topside domes touch each other. The physical contact between both vehicles is at only one point, thus it is unable to provide a bond sufficient for a safe flight. Therefore the vehicles are bonded with the magnetic forces. The mutual attraction of the main propulsors of both vehicles keeps the configuration joined together, whereas the mutual repulsion of the vehicles' side propulsors maintains the permanency of the reciprocal orientation of both Magnocraft. The propulsors with a high output which lift the entire configuration are: the main one in the lower vehicle and the side ones in the upper vehicle. The main propulsor of the upper Magnocraft and the side propulsors in the lower vehicle produce only a very small output, just enough to maintain the stability of the configuration. Both vehicles have their high-output propulsors oriented by unlike magnetic poles towards each other. Therefore the outlets of these propulsors must be joined by the columns of a highly concentrated magnetic field which looks like bars made of a black substance (see also the “black bars” from Figures G6, G10, and G28b). The cross-section of these black bars reflects the square shape of the Oscillatory Chambers that yield the magnetic field. The above illustration shows the course of several such “black bars”. The letters "N" and "S" indicate the polarity of the field yield of
particular propulsors. Notice that a sighting of a real vehicle, which had such a “spool-shaped” appearance, is illustrated in Figure S2 from volume 14 of this monograph.
b) An example of a semi-attached configuration ("flying necklace") formed from a chain of
spherical flying complexes which are further coupled together by their topside domes. The principles of this coupling are the same as for the configuration shown in part a) of this Figure. The forces that keep the configuration joined together are obtained from the mutual attraction of the vehicles' main propulsors. The side propulsors of both complexes are oriented repulsively towards each other, thus maintaining the steadiness of the mutual positioning of these complexes. To illustrate the polarity of the vehicles' propulsors the above diagram shows a cut-away view of the Magnocraft. Inside each spherical complex the presence of "angel's hair" is indicated (see also Figure G1b, G8 and V9 /?/). The outlets of some propulsors in the above configuration are mutually linked with “black bars” of the highly concentrated magnetic field. As the course and shape of these “black bars” would be identical to the one from part a) of this Figure, to avoid obscuring the clarity of the illustration presentation of these bars is not repeated. Note that in the illustrated manner any number and any type of complexes can be joined together, thus forming "flying necklaces" with almost unlimited length, shape, and variation of individual beads.

Figure G10 upper     Figure G10 lower

Fig. G10.
An example of the detached configuration. Illustrated is the coupling of two Magnocraft type K7 oriented base-to-base. The lower cross-section of this configuration illustrates the polarity of the propulsors in both vehicles. The mutual interaction between these propulsors produces two counter-balanced sets of forces which keep the vehicles apart, but also simultaneously fasten them together. The first set, formed by the main propulsors, causes the repelling of one Magnocraft from the other. The second set of forces, formed by the side propulsors, causes an attraction between both craft. The columns of the magnetic field joining the outlets of every pair of side propulsors facing each other are shown in black. As these columns have clearly distinguishable boundaries, they trap the light and therefore they appear as black bars. The cross-section of these bars must be square, as they reflect the shape of the Oscillatory Chambers that yield the magnetic field.


(Upper) An external view of the whole configuration. The shape, location, and the number of visible black bars is illustrated. Notice that during an actual appearance of this configuration the shape of the lower vehicle could become distorted by the action of a magnetic lens. Just such a case of a distorted lower vehicle is illustrated on photographs from Figure S1 in monograph 14 of this series.

(Lower) A vertical cross-section of the configuration. The mutual cooperation between propulsors is shown. An INSERT illustrates the polarity of two side propulsors facing each other, each one of which belongs to a different vehicle (notice a square black bar joining the outlets from both of these propulsors).

Figure G11 upper     Figure G11 lower

Fig. G11.
Examples of carrier platforms.
(Upper) An example of the carrier platform, i.e. a configuration formed when a

number of smaller Magnocraft are suspended under the base of a bigger mother ship. The distinctive characteristic of this flying arrangement of Magnocraft is that the main propulsor of each suspended Magnocraft is facing a side propulsor from the mother ship. The forces that join all the spacecraft together are created as the effect of mutual attraction occurring between one of the side propulsors of the mother ship and the main propulsor of each Magnocraft suspended under it. The illustration shows four Magnocraft type K3 (out of a total of eight vehicles type K3 possible to be carried by the sixteen side propulsors of a K5 type mother ship) clinging under the base of a K5 type Magnocraft.
Just such a flying carrier platform was captured on the photograph shown in Figure P14 from monograph 13 of this series.
(Lower) The "zigzag" carrier configuration formed when two Magnocraft of the same type are coupled base-to-base in such a way that the main propulsor of each of them faces the side propulsor of the other one. Illustrated is an example of the coupling of two type K6 vehicles. The above configuration is the other version of the carrier complex - see Figure G11a, and differs from the spherical flying complex presented in Figure G1b. At night, the glowing magnetic circuits of such a configuration produce a characteristic "zigzag" shape.

Figure G12a     Figure G12b     Figure G12c     Figure G12d

Fig. G12.
Flying systems. These are the most highly developed homogenous arrangements of the Magnocraft. (Homogenous arrangements are arrangements formed entirely from vehicles of the same type.) They provide a physical coupling of vehicles that belong to the same type, and usually are formed for the duration of interstellar travel.

a) A honeycomb-like single cell of such a flying system. The example shown here contains four cigar-shaped complexes obtained by stacking together the following number of Magnocraft type K3: (1) six, (2) two, (3) five, and (4) three. Indexes 1 and 3 are used to mark the magnetic axes of the Magnocraft oriented in the upright position, indexes 2 and 4 mark the axes of the vehicles oriented in the inverted position. "Z" is the central axis of the cell (the outermost edge of all the Magnocraft forming this cell must touch "Z" axis). Figures G16 and G17 illustrate basic principles involved in the formation of the above cell. The single cell from this illustration may be extended by attaching rim-to-rim an even number of stacked, cigar-shaped complexes that would form further similar cell formations. Examples of extended flying systems obtained in this manner are shown in the next two parts of this illustration.
b), c), d) Examples of unusual shapes that can be formed by the Magnocraft arranged into flying systems. Shown are:
b) panpipes, c) honeycomb, d) platform.
Notice that landing sites scorched in grass by such flying systems of Magnocraft are shown in Figure G37 below.

Figure 13

Fig. G13.
An example of a smallest flying cluster, which simultaneously represents a basic link in every larger flying cluster. Illustrated is one of the simplest cases of the linear clustering together of two spherical complexes type K6. The main advantages of the resultant configuration include: ability to couple together the Magnocraft of any possible arrangements and types (not only spherical complexes shown here), preserving the original configurations of vehicles that form the cluster, and flying the whole cluster with only one pilot. A flying cluster is obtained through the magnetic bonding of a number of independent vehicles which do not touch one another. Such bonding without physical contact is obtained by the formation of two opposite types of magnetic circuits: i.e. those that repel coupled vehicles (see circuits labelled (2) that are shown with a broken line) and those that simultaneously attract the vehicles (i.e. circuits (3) to (6)). The function of the links for these circuits is performed by "unstable units", i.e. vehicles whose propulsors produce only lifting and attraction forces (i.e. no stabilization forces) - see the complex on the right. Note that any other vehicles or arrangements can be attached in addition to the above cluster, under the condition that between every two stable units an unstable unit is placed to link them together.


a) A side appearance of this linear cluster. Illustrated are: the polarization of propulsors (N, S) in the coupled vehicles characteristic for the Northern Hemisphere; examples of magnetic circuits that provide each class of interactions required between both vehicles (i.e. separating (2), holding (4) to (6), tuning (3), and compensating (Ts)); and the penetration of the ground (G-G) by these circuits (this penetration causes the formation of very distinctive landing marks shown in part b) of this drawing). Note that to keep this illustration simple it has not been shown that every side propulsor of the unstable unit is either linked with the main propulsor of the stable unit by a holding circuit (see (6)) or is involved in a tuning circuit.
b) An overhead view of a distinctive landing site which such a linear cluster produces if it hovers over a crop field at a low height with the magnetic whirl mode of operation. (Photographs of just such landing sites in real crops are provided in Figure V3 from monograph no 12 of this series.) The labels link each characteristic element of this site with the appropriate class of magnetic circuits that produces this element. Note that a change in the height of the vehicles must result in a slight alteration of the site's shape and main features.

Figure G14-1 (a-b-c)    Figure G14-2 (a-b-c)


Fig. G14.
The principle of coupling two Magnocraft into a spherical flying complex.
(Upper) /G14-1/ Principle involving the so-called "routine through a semi-attached configuration". The active vehicle, which undergoes all necessary transformations, is the upper one. The passive vehicle, to which the active Magnocraft is to be joined, is the lower spacecraft. The coupling routine consists of the following
phases:
a) Orienting. The effect of this phase is the reciprocal confrontation of the propulsors from both craft. These propulsors, however, only interact with repulsive ("R") forces because they face each other with like magnetic poles.
b) Docking. The effect of this phase is the formation of a semi-attached configuration, in which both vehicles magnetically cling to each other because of the equilibrium of their mutual repulsion ("R") and attraction (A). In the docking phase the vehicles do not make physical contact with each other.
c) Linking. As the effect of this phase the spherical flying complex is formed in which both vehicles are physically linked and kept together by the forces of mutual attraction (A) of all their magnetic propulsors.
(Lower) /G14-2/ The principle of coupling two Magnocraft into a spherical flying complex, alternative to the principle shown in part (1) of this Figure. The routine illustrated here is called the "routine through a detached configuration". In this illustration the active vehicle is the lower one, whereas the passive vehicle is the upper one. Shown are: a) The orienting phase, b) The docking phase, c) The linking phase.

Figure G15

Fig. G15.
The forces of magnetic interactions caused by the Magnocraft's propulsors. Shown are: R, A - repulsion and attraction of the vehicle's propulsors by the environmental magnetic field (the action of these forces R and A tenses the Magnocraft in the axial direction); Q - relative attraction of the side propulsor and the main propulsor; Qd - radial components of the Q forces (compressing the Magnocraft in the radial direction); Qh - axial components of the Q forces (compressing the vehicle in the axial direction); E - relative repulsion between two side propulsors; Ed - the result of the repulsive forces E acting on a particular side propulsor (the set of the Ed forces tenses the vehicle in the radial direction). The interpretation of dimensions that exert influence on the value of forces, is illustrated on outlines of Magnocraft type K3 marked with a broken line.

a) Sectional view of the Magnocraft presenting forces acting in an axial plane. The interpretation of the dimensions involved is shown in an outline of the K3 type of Magnocraft drawn with a broken line.
b) Plan view of the Magnocraft showing forces which act in the radial plane.
c) Equilibriumcondition of forces acting in the axial plane, illustrated using vector notation.
d) Equilibrium condition of forces acting in the radial plane illustrated using vector notation.

Figure G16

Fig. G16.
An overhead view of one cell of the flying system arranged from four stacked cigar-shaped complexes joined rim-to-rim by the forces of attraction from their side propulsors. In order to form such forces, outlets from propulsors marked with the same letters must face each other in neighbourly vehicles (e.g. the outlet of U propulsors in vehicles 4 must face the outlet of the U propulsors in vehicles 3). The diagram illustrates that the dimensions of the Magnocraft must obey the equation (G12) “D = d/√2” which stems from the Pythagoras Equation (see also Figures G12, G37, and equation G34). Symbols: M – main propulsors; U, V, W, X - four groups of side propulsors the output of which pulsates with mutual phase shifts of 90°; Z - central axis of the cell (the outer edge of each Magnocraft forming this single cell of the flying system must touch the Z axis); d - the nominal diameter of the circle on which centres of the side propulsors within each spacecraft are located; D - the outer diameter of the Magnocraft. Indexes 1 and 3 are attributed to the spacecraft oriented in the upright position, indexes 2 and 4 are assigned to the spacecraft in the inverted position.

Figure G17a     Figure G17b     Figure G17c

Fig. G17.
The principles involved in the meshing of flanges in flying systems. These principles are illustrated with examples of vertical cross sections of pairs of cooperating cigars taking part in the formation of such systems. As shown, the cigars coupled rim-to-rim are oriented in reverse of each other (see also Figure G12). The joining forces are created by the positioning of the side propulsors of the coupled spacecraft in a straight line so that each is able to attract the propulsor of its counterpart. The diagram presents the coupling of the following numbers and types of Magnocraft: a) four Magnocraft of the K3 type, b) six Magnocraft of the K6 type, and c) seven Magnocraft of the K7 type.


Figure G18

Fig. G18.
A compendium of basic equations which combine the most important parameters describing the shape of the Magnocraft's shell. An interpretation of the dimensions involved is shown in an outline of the K10 type of this vehicle. Interpretation of the same symbols for Magnocraft of other types is shown also in Figures G15, G20, and G38. Symbols: "H" is the height of the craft (base to top); "D" is the outer diameter of the vehicle (it is expressed by the equation D = 0.5486x2K, thus for the Magnocraft type K10 it is equal to D = 561.75 metres); "DM" and "Ds" are the diameters of the spherical casings that cover the main and side propulsors; "K" represents the "Krotnosc" factor which in consecutive types of Magnocraft takes the integer values ranging from K=3 to K=10 (for the vehicle type K10 this factor takes the value K=10); "n" represents the number of side propulsors (for Magnocraft of K10 type this number equals to n = 36).

Figure G19a-K3    Figure G19a-K4     Figure G19a-K5     Figure G19a-K6

Fig. G19(a).
Side outlines of K3 to K6 types of Magnocraft. The Magnocraft of these types are characterised by a lens-like (i.e. sharp like edges of an optical lens) side flange. The outlines are obtained when equations describing the Magnocraft (listed in Figure G18) are resolved for each individual value of the "K" factor. Shown are the shapes of the crew cabin, the flange with side propulsors, and the transparent top bowl with the main propulsor. Because each type of Magnocraft looks different, knowledge of the above outlines allows for fast identification of the type of vehicle in question. Although this diagram does not illustrate the vehicles' underneath, each type of Magnocraft has a symmetrical concavity in its base which corresponds exactly to the topside convexity (in this way Magnocraft of the same type are able to stack one on top of the other, forming cigar shaped configurations as shown in Figure G7). Note that in order to show all vehicles with reasonable clarity, they cannot be drawn to the same scale. Therefore on the above drawing all types of Magnocraft are shown as is they have the same outer diameter D, although in reality these diameters are described by the exponential equation (G16) of the form: D = 0.5486x2K (where “x” indicates multiplication). In turn heights H of subsequent types of vehicles are expressed by the equation (G10): H = D/K. The dimensional scales for subsequent vehicles are shown next to these vehicles. In turn their exact dimensions are listed in Table G1.


Figure G19b-K7     Figure G19b-K8     Figure G19b-K9     Figure G19b-K10


Fig. G19(b).
Side outlines of K7 to K10 types of Magnocraft. The Magnocraft of these types are characterised by a by cylindrical (i.e. vertical and flat) peripheral of the side flange. The outlines are obtained when equations describing the Magnocraft (listed in Figure G18) are resolved for each individual value of the "K" factor. Shown are the shapes of the crew cabin, the flange with side propulsors, and the transparent top bowl with the main propulsor. Because each type of Magnocraft looks different, knowledge of the above outlines allows for fast identification of the type of vehicle in question. Although this diagram does not illustrate the vehicles' underneath, each type of Magnocraft has a symmetrical concavity in its base which corresponds exactly to the topside convexity (in this way Magnocraft of the same type are able to stack one on top of the other, forming cigar shaped configurations as shown in Figure G7). Note that in order to show all vehicles with reasonable clarity, they cannot be drawn to the same scale. Therefore on the above drawing all types of Magnocraft are shown as is they have the same outer diameter D, although in reality these diameters are described by the exponential equation (G16) of the form: D = 0.5486x2K (where “x” indicates multiplication). In turn heights H of subsequent types of vehicles are expressed by the equation (G10): H = D/K. The dimensional scales for subsequent vehicles are shown next to these vehicles. In turn their exact dimensions are listed in Table G1.

Figure G20

Fig. G20.
Compendium of easy to use methods of identifying the type of Magnocraft through determining its type factor "K". (Because all technical details of this spaceship are derived from "K", when this factor is known, the rest of the vehicle's dimensions and parameters can be learned from Table G1 or calculated from a set of appropriate equations listed in Figure G18.) Note that all vehicles shown on photographs from monograph 13 of this series always prove to meet every attribute and every dimension for corresponding type of the Magnocraft defined here.


#1. The method involving proportion of main dimensions. It allows for the direct determination of the vehicle's type factor "K", through measurement of the apparent height "H" of the observed spacecraft (base to top) and then determining how many times this height is contained within the outer diameter "D" of the vehicle's flange (the result of the division K=D/H represents the value of "K" which must take one of the following "integer" numbers: K=3, K=4, K=5, K=6, K=7, K=8, K=9, or K=10). In the above example the apparent height "H" is contained three times in the vehicle's apparent diameter "D", thus the illustrated vehicle is type K3 (i.e. its type factor is equal to: K=3).

#2. The method involving counting the number "n" of the vehicle's side propulsors. The "K" factor is then determined from the following equation (G9): K=1+n/4 (see also equations G2 and G6, and Figure G28).

#3. The method involving counting the number of the “SUB” lamps. The "K" factor is then determined from the following equation: K=(SUB)/2 + 1.

#4. The method involving counting the number "f" of magnetic waves. The "K" factor is then calculated from the equation: K=1+f, where f=n/4 (see also subsection G7.2 and Figures P19D and P29).

#5. The method involving counting the number "crew" of the vehicle's crew members. The "K" factor is equal to this number: K=crew (see Table G1).

#6. The method involving measurement of the nominal diameter "d" of the circular marks scorched during landings on the ground by the vehicle's side propulsors. The relationship between this diameter and the “K” factor is: d = (0.5486/√2)2K metres (see equation G34). Thus knowing "d", the value of "K" can either be calculated from this equation or learned from Table G1.

#7. The method involving identification of the vehicle's outlines by matching with the shapes of all eight types of Magnocraft listed in Figure G19 (K is determined through this identification).

#8. The method involving identification of characteristic attributes of the vehicle's interior. Data for this method is discussed in subsection G2.5. In turn an example of its use is provided in subsection P6.1.

Figure G21

Fig. G21.
The formation of force of magnetic buoyancy above the Earth's equator. This orientation of the Magnocraft optimizes the vehicle's interactions with the force lines of the environmental magnetic field. Therefore a solo flying vehicle favours turning its base perpendicularly to the local course of the environmental magnetic field (i.e. the field of the Earth, Sun or Galaxy). While flying above the Earth's equator, the main propulsor of the Magnocraft has its magnetic axis positioned tangentially to the Earth's magnetic field, and the magnetic poles of this propulsor are directed towards the like poles of Earth (i.e. N of the propulsor to the N of Earth, and S to S). Thus, this main propulsor forms significant repulsive forces "RN" and "RS" which lift the spacecraft. The extremely large effective length of the magnetic bubble produced by the vehicle's propulsors is appreciable even when compared with the diameter of Earth (see subsection G5.3). Therefore, in spite of the small physical size of the Magnocraft, its magnetic dimensions can be illustrated by the proportions from the above diagram.


Figure G22a     Figure G22b

Fig. G22.
A latitudinal thrust force - the formation of this force and the determination of the direction in which it acts.

a) The principle involved in the creation of a latitudinal thrust force by the magnetic whirl of the Magnocraft. In two points, higher "H" and lower "L", a different density of the environmental magnetic field prevails. This environmental field opposes the rotation of the magnetic whirl. It forms elemental forces of magnetic resistance "TH" and "TL" (TH < TL) which counteract the rotation of the vehicle's field (this resistance can be compared to that posed by the ground to a rotating wheel). The value of these elemental forces is proportional to the local densities of the environmental magnetic field. Therefore their integration along the perimeter of the vehicle's whirl produces the resultant thrust force "P" acting on the Magnocraft, causing its latitudinal flight from east to west or from west to east.
b) The method called the "rolling sphere rule" for determining the direction in which the Magnocraft is propelled by a particular spin of its magnetic whirl. In this method, the vehicle's whirling magnetic field is replaced by an imaginary sphere which rotates around the vehicle's central axis and whose surface touches the ground. The direction this sphere would roll is also the direction in which a given magnetic whirl propels the Magnocraft. In the illustrated example, the direction of the whirl's spinning would "roll" the imaginary sphere from east to west. Therefore the diagram presents the "solar" magnetic whirl which creates the thrust force "P" that propels the spacecraft in an east-to-west direction.

Figure G23

Fig. G23.
The principle for the creation of controlling torques: rotary "Ts" and rocking "Tp". The rotary torque "Ts" counteracts the magnetic whirl reaction and allows for control over the rotation of the Magnocraft. In turn rocking torque "Tp" counteracts the reactive torque from slanting the main propulsor of the vehicle, and allows for control over the rocking (levelling) of the Magnocraft.

The vehicle is illustrated flying in a direction from south to north. The meridional thrust force "RH" is produced by the main propulsor "M". The side propulsors located on the eastern "E" and western "W" sides of the Magnocraft produce stabilization forces "AE" and "AW" which are greater than such forces from the other side propulsors. The inclination angles "IE" and "IW" of these side propulsors are so controlled that each propulsor produces the same value of the vertical component of the stabilization forces, i.e. VE = VW. But the horizontal components of the stabilization forces are not equal, and thus the side propulsor located in the eastern part of the vehicle dominates over the western one, i.e. HE > HW. The difference in the values of both these horizontal components acting on the radius "R" produces the rotary torque: Ts=R•(HE - HW). See also Figure G13. For the formation of rocking torque “Tp” the situation is reversed, e.g. VE > VW when HE = HW, thus Tp=R•(VE - VW).
a) The overhead view of the flying Magnocraft illustrating the forces acting in the horizontal plane and the propulsors which produce them. For simplicity, only two side propulsors, vital for producing the rotary torque, are shown. Of course, during the actual flight, all the side propulsors would usually be operational (except that the output from the other side propulsors would not be so high).
b) The vertical cross-section of the side propulsor located in the western (W) part of the Magnocraft. Note that the total stabilization force "AW" produced by this propulsor can be resolved into the vertical component "VW" and horizontal component "HW", the value of which depends of the slanting angle “IW”.
c) The vertical cross-section of the side propulsor in the eastern part of the Magnocraft. Note that by controlling the inclination angle "IE", a change in the relation HE/VE (vertical/horizontal) stabilization force can be obtained. In connection with a similar action of the propulsor on the opposite side of the Magnocraft this forms the required value of rotary torque "Ts" or rocking torque "Tp".

Figure G24

Fig. G24.
Magnetic circuits formed by the K6 type of Magnocraft producing a stationary (i.e. non-whirling) magnetic field. Three types of circuits are illustrated, i.e. the central "C", main "M", and side "S". Symbols: N, S - magnetic poles of the vehicle's propulsors.

a) A vertical cross-section of the Magnocraft illustrating the path of particular circuits and the polarity of vehicle's propulsors.
b) An overhead view of the Magnocraft illustrating the distribution of the magnetic circuits around the vehicle's shell. The vehicle is shown as if it is operated in the "four-circuit mode".
Note that in real vehicles the magnetic circuits shown here were actually captured on photographs. These circuits are shown in Figure P19 from monograph 13 of this series.

Figure G25a     Figure G25b

Fig. G25. The spinning magnetic circuits of the Magnocraft type K6. The formation of a magnetic whirl is illustrated. The strands of the magnetic field presented here should be visible on photographs taken with a very short time of exposure, i.e. when the motion of the strands is unnoticeable on a single frame (e.g. see Figure P19). After putting into the spin these circuits ionise the air and form the spinning plasma cloud, which is able to perform a function of a huge “plasma saw”. Such a saw can evaporate rocks drilling glossy tunnels in them that are shown in Figures G31 and O6 /?/. Symbols: N. S - magnetic poles in the vehicle's propulsors.
(Upper) A vertical cross-section of the Magnocraft illustrating the polarization of propulsors and the vertical course of the whirling magnetic circuits. All three magnetic circuits are present. In the central magnetic circuit two "slip points" are indicated. Because the non-whirling magnetic force lines do not ionize air, outwards from these slip points the central circuit becomes invisible.
(Middle) A side view of the Magnocraft illustrating the main and side magnetic circuits in one of their many possible positions. The location of the field's strands reflects the situation shown in diagram (lowest).
(Lowest) An overhead view of the Magnocraft presenting the spinning magnetic circuits frozen in one of their many positions. Notice that the thickness of the successive strands of the field has a sinusoidal distribution, i.e. if the side propulsors "V" have their maximal output, the propulsors next to them (i.e. "U" and "W") are in the mean value of their output, whereas propulsors "X" produce no output at all - see also Figure G26b.
For photographs of the above magnetic circuits see Figure P19 from monograph 13.


Figure G26

Fig. G26.
The principle of the magnetic whirl formation (illustrated on an example of a K3 type of Magnocraft).

a) The pulsation curves for the outputs from the side propulsors. The sequence of phase-shifting in the pulsation of output in successive side propulsors is illustrated. The broken lines indicate two moments of time for which the parts b) and c) of this Figure present the distribution of a magnetic field. Symbols: F - value of the magnetic flux; t - time; T - period of the field pulsation; A - angular position of a magnetic wave maximum; U, V, W, X - curves of the output time variation for successive side propulsors.
b) The distribution of a magnetic field around the K3 type of Magnocraft at the moment of time t=3T. The outlines of the vehicle are shown from an overhead view. The lengths of radial broken lines coming outwards from the side propulsors are proportional to the value of output produced by these propulsors. The thick continuous line indicates the distribution of a magnetic field around the vehicle. The illustration shows the positions of two magnetic waves formed by the output from the side propulsors. Symbols: M - main propulsor; U, V, W, X - side propulsors; A - angular position of the magnetic wave under observation - here this wave is at 45°.
c) The distribution of a magnetic field at the moment of time t=1/2T. Notice that the maximum of the magnetic wave now occupies the angular position A=90°.

Figure G27

Fig. G27.
An example of the
"ionic picture of a whirl". This picture represents the apparent shape of the magnetic whirl surrounding an operational Magnocraft (illustrated above is a whirl formed by a motionless single Magnocraft type K3). The visible part of the ionic picture is formed from particles of ionized air (whose spin follows the rotation of force lines of the magnetic field around the central axis of the spacecraft). The outline of the vehicle is indicated by a broken line. Continuous lines illustrate the path of the three types of magnetic circuits formed from the output of the Magnocraft's propulsors, i.e. C - central circuit looping through the main propulsor only; M - main circuits passing through the main and side propulsors; and S - side circuits looping through the side propulsors only. The force lines of these circuits are kept spinning permanently. The blackened areas indicate the shape which appears to an eye-witness. The characteristic features of this shape are: 1 - the "upper slip point" of the central pillar; 2 - the pillar of central swirling; 3 - the block of main swirling; 4 - the flange of side swirling; 5 - the bulges of the lower part of the main swirling; 6 - the "lower slip point" usually concealed behind the main swirling and side swirling. Note that the motion of the Magnocraft may change (disperse) the visible shape of the magnetic whirl presented here. Manoeuvres of the Magnocraft, or more strictly the change of proportion between output from the main propulsor and outputs from side propulsors, may also cause a distortion of the picture shown here.

Notice that just such “ionic picture of a whirl” from a real vehicle is shown on photograph from Figure P20 of monograph 13 in this series.

Figure 28a   

Fig. G28a.
The visibility of propulsors in Magnocraft of K3 type. General view looking upward at a K3 type Magnocraft During the “throbbing”
mode of operation. Layers of ionized air at the outlets of the propulsors are indicated. These outlets are shown as if the twin-chamber capsules of all propulsors operate in the “inner flux prevalence” mode (see also Figure F6). When the light is subdued these layers should be visible with the naked eyes. Blackened areas (or more strictly squares viewed under various angles) indicate the outlets of the side magnetic propulsors (marked U, V, W, X). When the Magnocraft flies in the Southern Hemisphere, the side propulsors should emit a reddish-yellow light because their North (N) magnetic poles are oriented downwards. Crossed lines show the outlet of the main propulsor (marked M), which in the Southern Hemisphere should emit a blue-green light because its South (S) magnetic pole points downwards. Note that these colours are reversed (i.e. a reddish-yellow replaces a blue-green and vice verse) when the Magnocraft flies in the inverted position or changes hemispheres. Also, when viewed from overhead, the outlets of the same propulsors have colours which are the reverse of those seen from below.
The square shape of the propulsor's outlets as indicated above is characteristic only to the case when the vehicle's magnetic field is stationary (i.e. non-whirling), and when the observed Magnocraft is of the first generation. (Magnocraft of the second and third generation will have octagonal and sixteen-sided outlets from their propulsors.) But when this field begins to spin, the glowing patches of the ionized air become rounded and take the appearance as it is shown in part (A) of Figure K4. As the speed of their spinning increases, the whole air around the vehicle gradually starts to glow and the picture firstly transforms into similar to that shown in parts d) and e) of Figure K2, and then transforms into that shown in Figure G27.
Notice that just such location of propulsors in a real vehicle is shown on photographs from Figures P15 and P16 in monograph 13 of this series.

Figure 28b

Fig. G28b.
The visibility of propulsors in Magnocraft of K3 type. A side view of a detached configuration coupled from two Magnocraft of K3 type. The 
black bars” from magnetic field reveal the location of propulsors and the geometrical shape of devices that generated this field. Each such a bar represents one side propulsor in Magnocraft coupled in that manner. So by counting the number “n” of these “black bars” it is possible to determine the type of an observed vehicle (K = 1 + n/4). 
Notice that just such “black-bars” were seen by several eye-witness in a real vehicle and are illustrated with the drawing from Figure P12 of monograph 13 in this series.

Figure G29

Fig. G29.
The principle involved in formation of flashes with
a multiple image of a glowing magnetic circuit in night-time photographs of a Magnocraft taken when this vehicle flies in a throbbing mode of operation. (See also Figure P18 from monograph 13 of this series - which shows photographs of just such flashes emitted by Magnocraft-like vehicles.)

a) Outline of the Magnocraft with an indication of the layer of glowing air which flashes when being ionized along a side magnetic circuit (i.e. along the path of magnetic field force lines which join the opposite outlets of a side propulsor). Previous flashes of this glowing air are also indicated. Symbols: V - vector of the vehicle’s speed, T - period of pulsation of the magnetic flux (F) yield by side propulsors of this vehicle, t - time.
b) The image captured on a photograph of this spacecraft taken at night. Only the flashes from the air ionized by the magnetic circuit of a side propulsor are visible in darkness. The spreading of these flashes indicates the movement of the propulsor in the duration of film exposure. (Notice that in reality the background would be black and flashes would appear as white or of a bright colour.)
c) The curve F=f(t) of a variation in time (t) of the magnetic flux (F) produced by the side propulsor of this Magnocraft. This variation of the vehicle’s magnetic field corresponds to the “beat-type curve” explained in more details in Figure F7 from monograph 2 of this series. Such a field ionizes the air only when its value goes through a "peak". Therefore layers of air ionized by a vehicle's magnetic circuits must appear as a cascade of individual flashes spread along the vehicle’s path (instead of a continuous glow).

Figure 30

Fig. G30.
The location of SUB system lamps in the Magnocraft. The capital letters U, V, W, X are assigned to the lamps installed on the vehicle's flange. The small letters ui, vi, wi and xi label the four smaller versions of these lamps installed on the pilot's control panel.

The SUB system of lamps indicates the Magnocraft's mode of operation. This system is an advanced version of the navigation lights used in present aeroplanes. The colour pattern of the light flashed by each lamp reflects the state of the magnetic field produced by the group of side propulsors marked with the same letter with which this lamp is labelled (see also Figure G26), whereas the dynamic state of colours from all lamps simulate the general state of the field produced by the whole vehicle.
The sequence of colour changes in these lights, characteristic for the magnetic whirl mode of the Magnocraft's operation, is illustrated in Table G3. (This particular table illustrates colour signals that would accompany the magnetic whirl from Figure G26.) The table's rows show the subsequent colours that each lamp emits at a given moment of time to describe the operation of the propulsors labelled with a letter corresponding to that lamp. Observing only one lamp, it is evident that its colours change according to a sinusoidal curve that simulates the change of the magnetic field in a given group of propulsors. But observing only one colour (e.g. red), this table shows that with the elapse of time (i.e. after each quarter of the propulsors' period of pulsations) each colour moves to the next lamp. In this way the apparent motion of colours reflects the motion of the magnetic waves around the Magnocraft. Note that for the throbbing mode of operation, the colours of the lights would change in the same way in each lamp, whereas in the magnetic lens mode all the lamps would emit a yellow colour all the time.

Figure 31

Fig. G31.
The formation and characteristic attributes of tunnels evaporated during underground flights of the Magnocraft. Details are illustrated as they would be observed if the ground were transparent and thus revealing the tunnel and the vehicle which evaporates it. The final shape of the tunnel is defined by the fact that the Magnocraft during flights always tries to keep its floor perpendicular to the local course of Earth magnetic field. (This diagram from 8 March 1998 replaces an older and less illustrative version that tried to explain the same principle of formation of such tunnels.)


a) Principle of evaporation of tunnels. It shows the penetration of the native rock by a "plasma saw" of the Magnocraft which changed the direction of flight from the initial south to north, into the final illustrated here from an east to west. Symbols: 1 - the Magnocraft whose magnetic field spins and thus produces a whirling plasma saw, 2 - the spinning disk of the plasma saw which cuts into the rock and evaporates the tunnel, 3 - vapours of the rock that expand along the tunnel already evaporated, 4 - rock rubble that fell on the bottom of the tunnel behind the Magnocraft.
b) The breach from the tunnel. Such a breach is a crack in the native rock caused by the pressure of compressed gasses that expand towards the surface of the ground. It can later be used as an additional entrance to the tunnel. Symbols: 5 - the spewing of the rock vapours that forms a kind of miniature volcano at the breach outlet (the presence of this vapour discloses the location of the breach, 6 - the breach canal formed by the compressed vapours expanding to the surface of the ground.
c) An elliptical tunnel left by the Magnocraft flying in a north-south or south-north direction. Such a tunnel has an elliptical cross-section because its shape reflects the circular shape of the vehicle that flies with the base perpendicular to the environmental magnetic field - see also photographs of just such underground tunnels shown in parts b and d of Figure V6 from monograph 17 show hardened rock bubbles), 8 - the aerodynamic, although rough and craggy "apparent floor" of the tunnel, that represents the upper surface of the "rock bridge"; in horizontal tunnels this floor is flat and relatively even and dry, while in tunnels running under angle it has a shape of hardened "dunes" and "bridges" through which flows water, 9 - a "rock bridge" formed from hardened particles of native rock which bury the lower part of the tunnel (this bridge lies on the rock rubble), 10 - rock rubble that fills up the lower half of the tunnel and covers the "real floor" of the tunnel, 11 - water that accumulates in gaps between rock rubble and that forms a stream which flows under an apparent floor of the tunnel, 12 - the "real floor" of the tunnel along which water flows, 13 - the range of magnetic, thermal, and crystallographic changes in the native rock, caused by the action on this rock of plasma and field of the vehicle.
d) A triangular tunnel formed by the Magnocraft flying in an east-west or west-east direction. This shape results from reflecting in the rock the side outlines of the vehicle that evaporates this tunnel - see also a photograph of just such an underground tunnel shown in part a) of Figure V6 from monograph 17 of this series. Symbols: I - the angle of the vehicle's inclination reflecting the course of the force lines of the Earth's magnetic field and thus also the slanting of triangular tunnels or the degree of flattening of elliptical tunnels (or more strictly the ratio of the horizontal to the vertical axis). Symbols 7 to 13 have meaning explained in part c) of this Figure.

Figure G32

Fig. G32.
The explanation for a magnetic-lens effect produced by the central magnetic circuits of an ascending Magnocraft. This effect means that an observer who watches such an ascending Magnocraft from below sees only a twin-chamber capsule from the main propulsor, whereas the entire shell of the vehicle remains invisible to him/her (see also Figure F6). This is because in the ascending Magnocraft, the power of the magnetic field involved in the central magnetic circuit exceeds many times the power involved in the main and side circuits. Thus force lines of the central magnetic circuit hermetically surround not only the entire body of the vehicle, but also its main and side magnetic circuits. The extremely concentrated magnetic field from this central circuit interferes with light reflected to the observer. This interference manifests itself in the following two ways: (1) paths of light which pass across the field force lines are bent (i.e. the light reflected from the vehicle's body is deflected so that it does not reach the eye of an observer), but (2) light which passes along the field force lines is unaffected (i.e. the light reflected from the twin-chamber capsule reaches the eye of an observer). Therefore the observer, who watches such an ascending Magnocraft from below, can easily see a twin-chamber capsule from the main propulsor, but he or she is unable to see all the other parts of the vehicle which are hermetically sealed in magnetic force lines. (The appearance and photographs of just such capsules are illustrated in Figure F6 from monograph 2 and in Figures S5, S4, and S3 from monograph 14.) Symbols: 1 - path along which light is unable to pass through; 2 - unaffected path of light.


Figure G33


Fig. G33.
The dependence of the shape of landing site from the height (hx, hy, hz) at which a single Magnocraft hovers. The illustrated shapes are typical for the following situation: the base of a single vehicle is parallel to the surface of the ground, the axis of the main propulsor is parallel to the central axis of the vehicle, the position of the vehicle is upright, the magnetic circuits are spinning. When any of the above factors change, the shape of the landing site must also alter. For example a Magnocraft with a slanted base produces an elliptical landing, the tilting of its main propulsor shifts the central scorching (da/di) towards the magnetic north or south (see Figure G34b, turning the vehicle upside down eliminates the ring from side circuits (S), whereas a stationary (non-whirling) field produces a circle of evenly spaced scorched patches located under outlets from side propulsors.

a) The shape of marks formed when the height of hovering (hx) is greater than the critical span (hc) at which the central column of main magnetic circuits (M) separates into two loops. In the upper part of the drawing a vehicle's magnetic circuits are illustrated. A single Magnocraft has three kinds of such circuits, marked as: central ("C"), main (M), and side (S); e.g. the main circuits (M) join the outlets of the main propulsor with the outlets of all side propulsors (see Figure G24). In the lower part of the drawing the landing site scorched by these circuits is shown. The distinct features of this site are two concentric rings: the outer having the maximal diameter "do" close to the nominal diameter "d" of the vehicle, and the inner ring with the inner diameter "di". Because of the symmetry in bending the magnetic circuits, their intersection with the surface of the ground "G-G" fulfils the condition (G35): d-do=di-zero. After the transformation this condition leads to an extremely important corrective equation (G36): d=do+di, which makes the determination of nominal diameter "d" of the marks scorched on the ground independent from the height "hx" at which the vehicle hovered. Therefore such landing sites (Figure G34a) allow for precise measurement of these vehicles.
b) A mark scorched when the vehicle hovers at height "hy" which is smaller than "hc" but larger than the span "hs" of the side circuits. Apart from the ring of diameter "do" (smaller than "d") a further patch with the intensive centre of the diameter "da" is scorched. The corrective equation (G37) for this landing takes the form d=do-da (see Figure G34b).
c) Concentric rings scorched when a given vehicle landed on its base, or hovered at a height "hz" smaller that span "hs". In this case the inner diameter of the outer ring is equal to the outer diameter D of the vehicle.

Figure G34

Fig. G34.
Typical landing marks left by the Magnocraft hovering close to the ground in the standing position (i.e. when the vehicle's main magnetic circuits "M" penetrate the soil and reverse their paths underground). See also case b in Figure G33.


a) Cross-section of a type K3 Magnocraft and the ground showing distribution of the magnetic field from the main circuits "M". Note that when the spacecraft is hovering so close to the ground, damage to vegetation occurs only at points where magnetic circuits enter the soil. Symbols: PM - the main propulsor, M - the main magnetic circuits whose force lines loop through the main and side propulsors; K3 - the crew cabin, PU - one of side propulsors; G - the surface of the ground; I - the inclination angle of the Earth's magnetic field.

b) An overhead view from above of the ring of scorch marks left by this vehicle during the throbbing mode of operation. Symbols: 1 - the mark from the column of the magnetic field produced by the main propulsor (in the Northern Hemisphere this mark is dislocated towards magnetic north from the centre of the landing site); 2 - one of the burn marks produced by side propulsors; d - the nominal diameter of the vehicle's propulsion unit (i.e. diameter of the circle that passes through the centre of the side propulsors).

c) An overhead view of marks formed during the magnetic whirl mode of operation. Apart from the scorch patches "1" and "2" also formed during the throbbing mode of operation, the magnetic whirl additionally burns the circular trail "3". Note that when the vehicle hovers at a height greater than the critical "hc" (see Figure G33) then the central scorch patch "1" expands into an inner scorch ring (shown in Figure G33a). The most precise value of “d” provides a measurement carried out along east/west direction.

Figure G35


Fig. G35.
The marks left on landing sites by the inverted Magnocraft hovering just at the height where its magnetic circuits are tangential to the surface of the ground. The illustrated pattern of marks is not distorted by any slanting of the magnetic axes of the propulsors (as would be the case during a real landing). Symbols: C - the pillar of the central magnetic circuit and the mark caused by it; M - the main magnetic circuits and marks caused by them; S - the side magnetic circuits (note that in this orientation of the vehicle they do not reach the ground).

a) A cross-section of the vehicle and ground, showing the course of the magnetic circuits and the range of ground affected by them.
b) The series of concentric lines scorched by individual magnetic circuits during the throbbing mode of the Magnocraft's operation.
c) An overhead view of the almost complete scorched circle devastated during the magnetic whirl mode of this Magnocraft's operation.

Figure G36

Fig. G36.
The formation of a circle of swirled plants, or a "dust devil", caused by a low hovering single Magnocraft whose magnetic circuits loop entirely in the air (i.e. main paths of these circuits do not touch the ground). In areas covered with breakable vegetation, e.g. on crop circles, such spinning air creates a kind of characteristic swirl pattern of mechanically flattened vegetation. In turn on dry surfaces, such as country roads or sand dunes, the vehicle lifts into the air a moving funnel of dust. In many cases the vehicle which forms thus dust swirl remains invisible to observers (e.g. it screens itself with a magnetic lens). Then in folklore of various nations the effect of its action is called a "dust devil" in English, "chie fung" (i.e. "devil's wind") in Chinese, or "tańcujący diabeł" (i.e. "dancing devil") in Polish. Illustrated are: 1 - the stationary Magnocraft type K3 whose propulsion system operates in the magnetic whirl mode, 2 - the spinning magnetic circuits of the vehicle (these spinning circuits ionize the air, causing it to rotate also), 3 - the whirlwind of air (sometimes called the "devil's whirl") formed by the vehicle's spinning magnetic field, 4 - the nest of plants aerodynamically flattened and swirled in the direction of the whirlwind's rotation (the direction of this swirling allows to determine the direction of flight of the vehicle, according to the "rule of a rolling sphere" explained in Figure G22b).


Figure G37a     Figure G37b     Figure G37c

Fig. G37.
Examples of various landing patterns scorched on the ground by Magnocraft-like vehicles arranged into flying systems. The pattern (A) resembling a "four-leaf clover" is formed by the single cell of such a system (similar to the cell shown in Figure G12a). Pattern (B) is scorched by a flying platform six-rows wide, in this case consisting of forty-six cigar-shaped configurations coupled together with their side propulsors. Pattern ("C") represents a circular flying system eight-rows wide. For each example of the landing pattern shown are:


- a complicated curve (outline) of scorched vegetation left by side propulsors around the peripheral of an entire system (see a thick line composed of small half-circles),

- outer outlines of the cigar-shaped stacks of vehicles that participated in a configuration which scorched a pattern illustrated (i.e. complete circles drawn with thin lines represent overhead outlines of cigar-shaped arrangements that are positioned upright - see also Figures G12 and G7); these outlines are shown to realize the number and mutual positioning of the individual vehicles that scorch a given pattern, but - of course - they would not be visible in real landings,

- a net-like pattern of marks (thick dots) scorched on the ground by the main propulsors of each cigar-shaped arrangement,

- the principles for determining equations that describe two basic dimensions of each flying system (these dimensions are marked with symbols "du" and "di", and they should be measured in directions slanted 45 degrees towards each other).

Notice that real such landing sites scorched in grass by actual landed Magnocraft-like vehicles are shown in Figure V2 from monograph 17 of this series.

Figure G38

Fig. G38.
Some of the mathematical relationships existing in crop circles. When the configuration of the cluster forming a given circle is recognized, and the main mathematical equations (supplied by the theory behind the Magnocraft) describing the component vehicles are known, an investigator with a mathematical inclinations can find numerous equations that bound together all the dimensions indicated in this Figure. For example, the gap G between both vehicles is kept by a supervisory control-computer on a constant level equal to G=g•D (where g is a safety coefficient, in control-computers of K6 type UFOs programmed as g=0.5). The distance P between axes of both vehicles is described by the equation P=D(1+g). The angular position of the first tuning circuit is α=2π/n. The diameter φb of the circle flattened under the stable unit is dependent on the length "l" (measured from the base of one vehicle to the base of the other) of the magnetic circuit labelled (5), and fulfils the equation φb:hb=du:l (thus it is also a function of hb, hu, du, and P). Similarly the diameter φu is described by φu:hu=Db:l - index "u" refers to an unstable unit, whereas index "b" refers to a stable (balanced) unit. (The last two equations introduce numerous implications. For example when hu=hb, and the cluster consists only of vehicles of the same type, then φub = Db:du = √2. It should be stressed that the circles fabricated by pranksters do not fulfil the above sophisticated mathematics. Therefore the knowledge of these equations is one of the factors distinguishing the real circles from falsified ones. In the above illustration a cluster formed from vehicles type K3 is shown. The unstable unit (on the right) displays the greater depth of landing than that of the stable unit (on the left). Only magnetic circuits vital for the production of the illustrated marks are shown; their labelling corresponds to that in Figure G13. Note that to determine the dimensions illustrated here, at least the following equations provided by the “Theory of the Magnocraft” must be known and used: the outer diameter D = 0.5486x2K (where the K factor for K3 type UFOs is equal to K = D/H = 3); the nominal diameter d = D/√2, and the number of side propulsors n = 4(K – 1). Also note that relationships explained here actually do appear in real crop circles shown in Figure V3 from monograph 17 of this series.


Figure G39a-K3    Figure G39a-K4    Figure G39a-K5    Figure G39a-K6

Figure G39b-K7    Figure G39a-K8    Figure G39b-K9    Figure G39b-K7

Fig. G39.
The location and designation of subsequent compartments and spaces in discoidal Magnocraft. (This Figure illustrates descriptions from subsection G2.5.) The scales of dimensions in subsequent vehicles are provided under each type separately. Shells made of magnetoreflective material are circumscribed with a broken line. Each compartment of the Magnocraft has a concentric shape of a ring or crescent that runs around a vertical central axis "Z" of the vehicle. All types of the Magnocraft always have "K" compartments. The first two out of these "K" compartments are two propelling spaces, namely central propelling space ("C") and side propelling space (B). They exist in every Magnocraft and are utilised for storage purposes. Furthermore, depending on the type and size of the Magnocraft, further living compartments are present inside of the living space. These living compartments are marked with the following symbols in subsequent types of the Magnocraft: (1) = Central propulsion space "C", (2) = Side propulsion space "B", (3) = Pilots deck "P" also called "captain bridge", (4) = Specialisation hall "H", (5) = The storage area "F", (6) = Machine room "E", (7) = Living quarters "A", (8) = Recreation centre "R", (9) = Hangar deck "L", (10) = Workshops "D". Note that the Magnocraft type K3 have compartments marked 1, 2, 3; the Magnocraft type K4 - compartments marked 1, 2, 3, 4; etc. Other symbols: G - hermetic gates, T - a side elevator ramp running between levels, W - a main elevator ramp for inter- level communication. The illustration of compartments in a K7 type of Magnocraft is also shown in Figure P30.


(Left column) /G39a-K3 bis G39a-K6/ Interior of vehicles of K3 to K6 types, with a lens-shaped side flange.

(Right column) /G39b-K7 bis G39b-K10/ Interior of large vehicles of K7 to K10 types, with a flat vertical circumference of the side flange.

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